Nobles Parents' E-Newsletter

May 2011

Nobles Parents' E-Newsletter May 2011

May 2011: Class IV Notes



To All Class IV Parents

Since this is our final E-Newsletter as your representatives, we want to extend our profound gratitude and appreciation to all of you for your outstanding participation and support this past year which made our job exceedingly easy and pleasurable.

Your generous donations of time, money, ideas and energy made a profound difference and were highly appreciated and valued. We particularly want to acknowledge and offer our heartfelt thanks to the many volunteers who enthusiastically and repeatedly devoted their time and energy to ensure that our many activities were highly successful and enjoyable. Special thanks, as well, to Carolyn and Eric Harthun for opening their home for our spring dinner. We could not have asked for better, warmer, or more accommodating hosts and we are very grateful to them.

Thanks to all of you, our children had a truly positive, successful and memorable year. Please remember the last PA meeting on May 5 where the Class III representatives will be announced. We look forward to working with them.

We hope your upcoming summer months are safe, healthy, relaxing and enjoyable. Many Thanks!!

Warmly,
Betsy M. Allen – mother of Jason - allenlawgroup@aol.com
Kathy Fitzgerald – mother of Audra & Julia - katkiss1@comcast.net
Suzie Montgomery – mother of Max - s.montgomery33@comcast.net

Overseas Opportunities For Nobles by Bob Henderson, Head of School



A few days ago my “Google Alert” sent me an email with links to a couple of articles that had appeared in the English-language Korean press about Noble and Greenough School. Opening those stories, I was surprised to read the interpretation that we are about to open a campus in that country. The reality is significantly more modest, although it is true that we have been engaged for the last several months in conversations with the Jeju Free International City Development Center (the JDC), from Jeju Island in South Korea. We have been exploring what it might mean to have a second campus there. A day after these stories appeared, a student came up to me on the sideline of a game and asked me, “Mr. Henderson, can you tell me about our secret school?” So I thought it would be important in this forum, for the sake of transparency, to give a little background and explain what this exploration does, and what it definitely does not, mean.

First of all, you should know that we have not made any commitment other than to study the idea. In our quest to always make Nobles better and to think outside of the constrictions of current circumstances, when we were invited by folks in Korea to learn more, we decided we should. Nearly a year ago, Nobles was approached by the JDC to consider a proposition to open a school on Jeju Island. When asked, “Why Nobles?,” they responded that they had done their homework and were seeking partnerships among the best private schools in the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom. Their proposal included a commitment to cover all of Nobles’ costs, including expenses for constructing an entire campus. We learned that three notable independent schools had already walked a long way down this road with the JDC, including one from London, one from Toronto, and another American school, St. Albans School, in Washington, D.C. Jeju Island struck us as a very interesting location, offering diverse ecosystems and a beautiful physical setting, within two hours by plane of a population of more than 250 million people in Korea, China and Japan.

This fell into the context of our school mission, which asserts our objective to cultivate global citizenship. As we implement our long-range plan over the next several years, a key component will be the expansion and clearer articulation of our experiential education program. Central to experiential education at Nobles is travel, including study overseas. All of these elements have driven our curiosity about the idea of a greater presence in Asia. While a second campus was certainly far more than we had previously contemplated, the notion that the financial impact might be quite minimal obligated us, we felt, to investigate more thoroughly.

Rest assured that we will only continue to pursue this if we feel we can successfully transport our school mission and essential school culture to a new location; we are not interested in simply selling our “brand.” An enterprise of this magnitude can only be undertaken if we have complete confidence that the main campus here in Dedham, and the experience of students here, will be significantly enhanced, and in no way undermined. And we have to develop effective means to assess and measure the undertaking.

So where are we now in this process? The recent “Google Alerts” were stimulated by the fact that in early April, Nobles signed a “Memorandum of Understanding” (an MoU) with the JDC. The core language of this very simple MoU asserts that the document:

“…affirms Nobles’ interest in exploring the building of a school in the Jeju Global Education City. Nobles will undertake its own initial feasibility study…with the goal of finalizing the terms of a second MoU … This MoU does not bind either The Jeju Free International City Development Center or Noble and Greenough School for any course of action other than discussing the terms of a second MoU.”

A second campus is by no means imminent. Over the next several months we intend to study this proposition and opportunity carefully, prior to signing a more direct MoU, or withdrawing from the project (having learned it is not a wise path for us). So if you happened to receive the same “Google Alert” as I did, or if you happen to regularly read the English press from Korea or Jeju, please know that this is an early courtship -- with a very uncertain outcome -- and not a marriage! While it lasts, it is our intention to learn and explore as much as possible, intending to be better prepared for challenges and possibilities in global education in the years ahead.

Thinking of Summer - And Summer Reading



There is ample data to suggest that high school-age students are simply not reading enough — and there is overwhelming data that says high school students should use the summers to read more in order to maintain critical thinking skills gained over the academic year and improve reading comprehension. Between the distractions of summer activities (jobs, camps, various programs, the allure of texting and the internet, etc.) teenagers are staying away from books.

To that end, we have crafted some new requirements around summer reading that we wanted you to be aware of. Every student in the Upper School will be required to read three books for Nobles over the summer (and we hope many more for themselves). The requirements will be:

1. Zeitoun by David Eggers will be the Nobles Community Book for this summer. All students and faculty are expected to read this book.
2. Every level of history will read an assigned book in preparation for their fall (or year-long) history course.
3. Students are required to read one other book from the list provided by the Nobles English Department and Nobles librarians. Students who are not taking a history class (primarily some students in Classes I and II) will choose two books from this list.

Students will be assessed on these books during their first week back. We hope and trust these titles will provide ample opportunity for interesting and relevant reading over the summer (and we encourage parents to read right along with their kids!). Lists will be available on the Nobles website by June 8.

What's in a Name? The MPA Becomes the APC by Steven Tejada, Dean of Diversity Initiatives



The Multicultural Parents' Association will soon be known by a new name. Starting this summer, the group will be known as the ALANA Parents Committee (APC). ALANA (African American, Latino/a, Asian American, Native American and Biracial) is an acronym that is commonly used at colleges and universities. Although the name of the group is changing, the mission will remain the same. The purpose of the group is to provide a forum and network for parents/guardians of students of color to discuss and support the unique experiences of ALANA students at Nobles.

Why the change?

1) Clarification of the group’s purpose. It was clear that the use of the words “Parents' Association” within the MPA title was causing confusion. Many questions resulted from the use of this name — Was the Multicultural Parents' Association a separate Parents' Association? Was it a subset of the PA?

Who is invited to the MPA? The group was never meant to be an offshoot of the Parents' Association or an alternative option for parents. ALL parents are members of the PA and involvement from a diverse group of parents is strongly encouraged. The PA is also encouraged to explore diversity topics as part of their agenda. The APC is a network specifically for parents and guardians of ALANA students. It provides a space where parents who share this unique experience can come together to discuss, affirm and support the experiences of their children. The group works with the Diversity Initiatives Office to support events that enhance the experience of ALANA students and also supports general diversity events that benefit the entire community.

2) Clarification of diversity language at Nobles. The term “multicultural” caused confusion and was at times being misused. “Multicultural” had morphed into another way of describing ALANA students. Multiculturalism actually involves the appreciation and promotion of many cultures. For example, our Multicultural Student Association is open to students of ALL cultures and backgrounds and is our main student diversity group on campus. Our Multicultural Fair involves the celebration of cultures and countries as varied as France, Korea and Dominica. The experience of students of color is simply one aspect of our broad multicultural and diversity programming.

3) ALANA sounds much cooler. ALANA just rolls off the tongue in such a refreshing manner. Try it out for yourself — stand in front of a mirror and say ALANA three times in a row. You will feel rejuvenated!

The truth is that diversity language (and language in general) is constantly evolving and at times is even imperfect. Even the acronym ALANA fails to list in depth the various groups that fall under the umbrella term (West Indians, Indians, Pacific Islander, Multiracial, etc.) However, I do think the term ALANA Parents' Committee provides a little more clarity and aims to be inclusive of the wide range of experiences and backgrounds of students/families of color. Be on the lookout for announcements from the APC in the near future!

Thank you,

Steven Tejada
Dean of Diversity Initiatives

News from Foster Gallery



2011 Student Show—Works from the AP Studios
May 9—June 3
Reception—Wednesday, June 1, 2011 from 5:30-6:30 p.m.

Please join us on Wednesday, June 1, to celebrate this year's AP Student Show. The show features a broad range of works by students in the AP Ceramics, Photography and Drawing/Painting classes. Participating artists include: Hannah Robinson, Mike Nelson, Zach Ellison, Saul Rosen, Rebecca Fine, Niki Chimberg, Julia Weber, Elvis Lara, Sameer Lal, Caroline Vietze, Justin Jones, Jeff Romano, Felix Liang, Izzie MacKinnon and Adam Keally.

Duo Recital at Foster Gallery
Thursday, May 12, 2011
4:00 p.m.

Dr. Yi-Lan (Elaine) Niu, soprano and Dr. Christopher Cramer, classical guitar

Soprano Yi-Lan (Elaine) Niu and classical guitarist Christopher Cramer present a musical journey through time as they perform masterworks of the classical music repertory. From the 16th-century Elizabethan elegance of John Dowland to the 20th-century Spanish passion of Joaquín Rodrigo, the duo’s performance connects the past to the present including newly composed works by contemporary composers Chiwei (Jerry) Hui and Alexander Nohai-Seaman. The program will also include works by Heinrich Schütz, Johann Kaspar Mertz, Jorge Cardoso, Jorge Morel, and Heitor Villa-Lobos.

For more information, please visit www.fostergallery.org.

A Nobles Parents' Guide to the End of the School Year by Ben Snyder, Head of Upper School



For most of my Parents' E-Newsletter articles I tend to focus on themes of education or issues that kids, parents and schools face. As we head down the home stretch of the school year, however, it is important to get really practical about what the final weeks entail. The combination of events leading up to graduation for seniors and exams for our remaining students can become overwhelming if not carefully tracked and planned for.

I get particularly concerned in the spring that students get "over-stretched" in their commitments just as we enter arguably the most important academic phase of the year. Final exams present real challenges for many students (for some it will be their first time taking cumulative exams), and while teachers do devote time to review, students who do not begin to at least organize their study time and materials now often pay a price at the end. As the weather gets better and the activity alternatives become more enticing, the temptations for losing focus can be overwhelming.

Here are a few suggestions:

1. Please try to help your child take some time each weekend to organize notes, tests, quizzes, old review sheets and syllabi so that when exam preparation time comes these materials will be readily available. As of this writing there are only six weekends before final exams and, while it might feel unrealistic to create study sheets before the last few weekends, some students may have the time to start nibbling away at it.

2. If your child is "done" with homework early in the evening and is tempted to flick on the TV or get on the phone or online, encourage a quick half hour to review one or two subjects. Quick but regular review of material from earlier in the year can make a huge difference when it comes down to exams.

3. Find out if there are major papers or projects coming up (there almost always are —Class III Novel Project, etc.) and help your child plan his or her time. Teachers have often already done this, but being "on schedule" can make an enormous difference.

4. If your child is having difficulty in a particular course, NOW is the time to see that teacher for extra help (if this has not already been set up) – with special attention paid to exam preparation.

5. Sleep is a critical factor in learning. If your child is out or up late — especially on the weekends — it will hinder learning. Know where your child is at all times (keep calling fellow parents to ensure that your child is appropriately supervised) and encourage catching up on the weekends (and discourage sleepovers if possible — they are generally a recipe for sleep deprivation at best). Returning to school on a Monday exhausted from a weekend of activity is an incredible disadvantage in academic work. Especially on the days of exams, sufficient sleep and healthy food (a good breakfast is critical!) will ensure focus and keep your child healthy.

6. Work with your child's advisor or individual teachers if he/she needs additional advice on preparation and organization for the end of year. Students feel "pressured" in different ways and communication with an advisor or trusted teacher can often prevent the "brush off" from kids around these issues — or the advisor can get the same message across.

7. Be careful of making too many commitments. Spring is a time of numerous soccer, basketball and hockey tournaments, outside recitals and performances, family gatherings and other commitments that can require enormous amounts of time. It is important to try to gauge how much time these commitments will take.

For some students (especially juniors with AP exams, standardized test prep, afternoon program activities, etc.) it may seem unrealistic to expect much work to be done ahead of the final week in preparation for exams. However, the basic principles of using the weekends to catch up, communicating openly and honestly with teachers at crunch times and asking for help from the advisor when things feel overwhelming apply even more as we head down the stretch. We look forward to seeing you at as many events as you can attend as another successful school year draws to a close.

Bussey NEW Newsletter Don't Miss the Game Changers by Bill Bussey, Provost



I was reading the New York Times (Saturday, April 23rd) in a Starbuck’s the other day and came across a front page story about a doctor who had practiced family medicine for 32 years and couldn’t give his practice away. The article stated that “doctors like him are increasingly being replaced by teams of rotating doctors and nurses who do not know their patients as well. A centuries-old intimacy between doctor and patient is being lost, and patients who visit the doctor are often kept guessing about who will appear in the white coat.” A few days later in the very same shop I witnessed a customer berating the teenage employee running the register. The customer, loud and agitated, wanted to know in no uncertain terms how much longer “that sound” would continue. After a few back and forths, it became clear that the offensive sound was the coffee grinder, grinding coffee. Everyone stared at their shoes as the customer made it clear in no uncertain terms that “the sound” was getting in the way of his conversation. It was like someone on top of Everest expressing disdain for the howling wind.

On one hand, many of us have come to expect getting what we want as quickly as possible, but at the same time we still value the meaningful connections and relationships that will stand the test of time. Yet, these days time itself seems to be in short supply and with it often goes patience, perspective, and the ability to roll with the punches. In a society in which the various lists, scores and ratings increasingly (and inexplicably) gain credibility as standard bearers for leadership, status and success, I cannot help but wonder if many of our children will allow realistic expectations and meaningful relationships for their own children to go the way of quilting bees and barn raisings. Look at the current tone of our national discourse and tell me that reason and relationships seem like valued qualities.

More importantly, in the age of the specialist, we cannot allow ourselves or our children to believe that certain classes, activities, and relationships are by themselves a means to an end. We also must never allow ourselves or our children to create a world within this relationship-based community in which we quietly reduce the many benefits of this vibrant institution to self-serving categories of what really counts. If your children believe that the holy grail for self-worth is simply where they end up attending college and that they in turn limit themselves to whom and what they perceive are the people, courses or activities that will make it all happen, they will run the risk, among many things, of failing to recognize those small moments in life that are often true game changers.

I have long forgotten the name of the college instructor whose class influenced me more than others. He was a heavy-set graduate student, an anonymous sort of guy with black hair and glasses, and only a few years older than I was, In order to earn his keep, he was saddled with teaching a freshman expository writing class. Some thought he was a grind and a bit of a dandy, but he hooked me into the world of John Simon and Pauline Kael, among many others, and gave me the opportunity to explore things on paper that truly interested me. He also taught me to learn from those around me instead of being resentful or intimidated by those who could truly write well. On the last day of class he stood in front of us and orally doled out our final grades. He gave me an A- and then paused and looked at me and said, “I think you’ve got something.” That was it.

There might have been a lot things folks thought this guy wasn’t, but for me he was the right guy, with the right words at the right time, and that made all the difference.

From the Parents' Association Co-Chairs



One of the busiest months of the school year, May provides ample opportunities to enjoy the Nobles community and to celebrate our children's accomplishments. Parents of Sixies can share their children's adventures as they travel "Round the World"; Fifthie parents can cheer their favorite entries at the Solar Car Races; and Class I parents can attend Senior Arts Night and Senior Project Night. We encourage you to refer to the Class Notes in this E-Newsletter and check the password-protected Parents' Calendar on the website for a full listing of class-specific events.

There are also several all-school events in May, including the spring musical, Urinetown, the choral concert, and the AP Art Show in the Foster Gallery.

As we prepare to relinquish our PA responsibilities, we would like to extend our sincere thanks to all those who have supported us and furthered the PA mission during the past year. Unveiled last spring, the PA mission statement reads:

"All parents and guardians of Nobles students are members of the Parents' Association, which supports the school's mission, its faculty, administration and students. The Parents' Association builds and sustains community by:

- Reaching out to all families from the time of admission;

- Encouraging camaraderie and spirit through events for parents, students, faculty and staff;

- Organizing community service beyond the school's boundaries."

So many of you have played essential roles in bringing every aspect of this statement to life. We greatly appreciate your time, energy, creativity and talents.

Enjoy the rest of the school year and have a great summer.

With best wishes,
Melanie Mace (momsj894@aol.com) and Fiona Roman (fififi@verizon.net)
Parents’ Association Co-Chairs

Class I Deans' Report



We can’t believe spring is already here and that it is time to write our final E-Newsletter. We’re sure that the time has passed even faster for you and your family. We wanted to take this opportunity to thank you for such a wonderful year. We can remember many of the Class I students as ninth graders in our HHC classes or on our teams, and it has been fun seeing them grow over these past four years. We feel lucky to have had the opportunity to work with them in their final year at Nobles. We also wanted to thank the Senior Parent Representatives, Lori Giandomenico, Amy McLaughlin-Hatch and Yvette Shakespeare, for all of their work and planning this year.

It was great to see many of you at the Parent Event on Tuesday, April 26, where Dr. Kadison from Harvard University’s Mental Health Services came to Nobles to speak about the important transition you and your seniors will go through this spring, summer and into next fall. We hope that you found his advice useful and will be able to use it in the months ahead. We included some reading material on transitions at the end of this note that you might find useful. Additionally, if you were able to attend, we would love to hear any suggestions you may have about how we might improve the event for next year.

As we head into the homestretch, please do not hesitate to contact us if you have any questions about anything that is happening on campus. This time of year is jam packed, so it might not hurt to double check the calendar as well as the letter from Bob Henderson, and check in with your senior(s) and us.

Whether it may be a casual conversation in the Alcoves, a quick coffee trip or a walk down to the MAC, we look forward to spending the remaining few weeks with this group. Each member of this class has accomplished so much during his/her time at Nobles and given so much to the Nobles community. Now it is time to celebrate! Congratulations to you and your senior(s)!

Fondly,
Meghan Cleary Hamilton and Nahyon Lee


Reading List:
College of the Overwhelmed by Richard Kadison and Theresa Foy DiGeronimo (Jossey-Bass, 2004). Dr. Kadison, one of the co-authors of this book, was our guest speaker for Transitions Night. The book discusses mental health concerns on campus and outlines stresses that college students can face. They give suggestions for parents and students on coping mechanisms, as well as tips for parents on how to help their children with the college life.

Don't Tell Me What to Do, Just Send Money: The Essential Parenting Guide to the College Years by Helen E. Johnson & Christine Schelhas-Miller (St. Martin's Griffin, 2000).
Written by two women involved with parent programs at Cornell, this book touches on virtually everything from the summer before first-year to post-college planning. The format consists of pairs of hypothetical conversations between parent and child on an issue: the first disastrous, the second, based on the principles the authors espouse, more effective.

Getting the Best Out of College: A Professor, a Dean and a Student Tell You How to Maximize Your Experience by Peter Feaver, Sue Wasiolek, and Anne Crossman

Letting Go: A Parents' Guide to Understanding the College Years by Karen Levin Coburn and Madge Lawrence Treeger (Harper Perennial, 1997). A slightly dated but still useful summary of the psychology of late adolescence followed by practical tips drawn from students and parents from a number of colleges.

Making the Most of College: Students Speak Their Minds by Richard J. Light (Harvard, 2001). A fascinating and highly readable account of the results of a project at Harvard in which students were asked what had been most useful to them in their college careers.

Transition Year: Your Source for Emotional Health at College. New online resource that helps students and parents focus on emotional health before, during and after the college transition. Includes articles, resources and various checklists.
http://www.transitionyear.org/

When Your Kid Goes to College: A Parents Survival Guide by Carol Barkin (Avon Books, 1999) A straightforward look at the issues, from the "Summer of Anticipation" to "Advice from a College Senior."

May 2011: Class I Notes



Dear Class III Parents,

It is hard to believe this is the last Class III Newsletter of the year! We have enjoyed being your Class Reps and want to thank all of you who made our job easier by contributing in so many ways. From the Fall Parent Social at the Castle to the Head of School Dinner Dance in March, the recent Spring Parent Dinner hosted by the Oristaglios in Boston to the Surprise Lunch and two morning coffees, we have had nice opportunities to come together to plan, work and socialize. These events were made possible by your tremendous generosity, teamwork and spirit!

While our Class III Parent events are finished for the year there are some important May and June dates to note:

Tuesday, May 17 through Thursday, May 19: Spring Musical, 6:30 p.m., Vinik Theatre

Friday, May 20: Spring Musical, 7 p.m., Vinik Theatre

Saturday, May 21: Spring Musical, 2 p.m., Vinik Theatre

Thursday, May 26: Choral Concert, 7 p.m., Lawrence Auditorium

Monday, May 30: Memorial Day – No Classes

Friday, June 3: Graduation, 10 a.m.

Friday, June 10: Make ups, Faculty Comment Writing Day/No Classes

Monday, June 13: Final Day of School

We hope the end of the year goes smoothly for you and that you have a great summer!

Warmly,
Kris Ganong - ganongfamily@verizon.net
Valerie Kolligian Thayer - vkolligian@aol.com

May 2011: Class I Notes



April was a busy month with Class Dinners, Prom and Transitions Night. A big thank you to all who helped with these events. May promises to be busy and exciting as well. Kristi Geary, Faith Pongor and Betsy Frauenthal, the chairs of The Way We Were, have been busy organizing the components of this event with a group of volunteers. If you still wish to volunteer, it’s not too late. Please contact them if you wish to help on the day of the event. For clarification, The Way We Were is an event held from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Tuesday, May 31, at the Omni (or outside on MacLeod Field, weather permitting). It is designed to allow Class I students to relax and have fun with each other the way they used to do when they were younger: playing childhood games and competing for prizes. They will also have a special lunch. It is a great time for bonding and reminiscing.

The other events leading up to graduation are:

Tuesday, May 31: Senior Project Night, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Lawrence
Wednesday, June 1: Senior Arts Night, Arts Center
Thursday, June 2: Graduation Rehearsal and Awards Night
Friday, June 3: Graduation

Thank you to all of you who have helped make this last year at Nobles a special one by contributing your time, energy, talent, and generosity. We couldn’t have done this without you.

Thanks,
Yvette Shakespeare - YVShake@aol.com
Amy McLaughlin-Hatch - yogaamy@comcast.net
Lori Giandomenico - LGiando@verizon.net

Class III Dean's Report by Tara Cocozza



The last time I wrote a newsletter, we were awaiting one of our many snowstorms from this winter. The weather certainly has transitioned since then, and each warm and sunny day we have reminds us that summer is not far away. Although the change in weather is a clear indicator that the school year is coming to a close, June always approaches more quickly than the students think it will. The next month will be full of academic challenges, athletic contests, musical performances and events leading up to the graduation of Class I, all of which contribute to how fast the month of May passes.

There have been several highlights from Class III in the second semester, and I would like to take this opportunity to applaud the students for their many achievements. All Class III students will have completed two major projects by mid-May: the US History Research Paper and the Novel Project in English III. Both of these projects are milestones of the Class III experience, and I commend the students for successfully navigating each of them while balancing their regular workload and extracurricular commitments. I also would like to acknowledge the students who applied to study away from Nobles for either a semester of next year or for the entire academic year. All students who applied to different programs took a risk in doing so, and I commend them for wanting to explore opportunities away from our campus. It takes courage to leave one’s surroundings for something that is challenging and unfamiliar, yet I know how much students grow when they participate in these valuable programs. Although Class III students will miss those who have decided to attend these programs, I know that everyone will benefit from hearing about their experiences upon their return.

There are several people whom I would like to thank as the year comes to a close. I especially want to express my sincerest gratitude to Kris Ganong and Valerie Thayer, both of who spent many hours planning and organizing events for Class III parents and guardians. I offer many thanks to Kris, Valerie and all of the parents and guardians who helped make the Class III Head of School Dinner and Dance on March 5 a great success. I appreciate how much planning went into making the event successful, and I can assure you that the students had a great time. I also would like to acknowledge the four SLC Representatives (students Alison Grogan, Savannah Horton, Caleb Kirshner and Cyrus Veyssi) who worked hard all year long to strengthen the spirit of their class and to create fun and engaging activities during our bi-weekly Class Meetings.

As I mentioned above, there are many events coming up in the next month, and all of these events can be found on the Nobles calendar. I hope that you join the other teachers and me and encourage your children to finish the year in a positive way and on a strong note in all of their classes and extracurricular activities. In order for you to plan ahead, I have listed the most important dates below:

Spring Musical: May 17-21
Nobles-Milton Weekend: May 27-28
Memorial Day (No school): May 30
Graduation: June 3
Exams: June 6-9
-June 6: English (a.m.) and Classics (p.m.)
-June 7: Science (a.m.)
-June 8: Modern Language (a.m.) and History (p.m.)
-June 9: Math (a.m.)
Final Day of School: June 13

I have enjoyed working with Class III once again this year, and I am eager to see the students become leaders in our community as they transition to being upperclassmen next fall. I look forward to a solid finish to this academic year, and I wish you a safe, healthy, peaceful and fun summer.

Best,
Tara Cocozza

From Community Service



"All of us are born for a reason, but all of us don’t discover why. Success in life has nothing to do with what you gain in life or accomplish for yourself. It’s what you do for others." ~Danny Thomas, Founder of St. Jude’s Hospital

So many students, faculty and staff members have been doing great community service work this spring. Here are just a few highlights:

Students who traveled on Spring Break service trips not only connected to established not-for-profits, but also forged friendships with new organizations doing important work. The service trips strive to stay connected to new and old friends now that we're back in Dedham.

A variety of school groups organized events to support the Japanese recovery efforts. Tomohiro, Yu, and Yukari, our visiting Japanese exchange students, ran the James Joyce Ramble on May 1, with a group of Nobles supporters. Their hope was to raise awareness and to encourage all of us to not forget those in Japan who continue to get their lives in order.

Sixteen teams played in the 5th Annual Tenacity Tennis Tournament. All proceeds benefited Tenacity, Boston (www.tenacity.org).

More than 25 members of the Brother 2 Brother group supported Project Bread by participating in the Walk for Hunger.

Save the Dates: May

Friday, May 6: dawg-a-pella 3 - An evening of a cappella music to benefit organizations in New Orleans. Concert starts at 7:30 p.m. in Lawrence Auditorium

Saturday, May 14: 12th Annual Stamp Out Hunger Drive, located at Buildings and Grounds 1-5 p.m. Volunteers are needed to unpack and sort mail trucks delivering food picked up in Dedham neighborhoods. It is the largest one-day food collection in the nation. Students will deliver the sorted boxes to the Dedham Food Pantry on Monday, May 16.

Sunday, May 15: Sudanese Education Fund Triathlon in Marlboro, Mass. We were fortunate to host an art show in April for the SEF and met many of the Lost Boys. Contact Linda Hurley and visit www.sudaneseeducationfund.org for more information about this event.

Monday, May 30: The Bulldawg Blues Band, led by Doc Channonhouse, will perform at the West Roxbury Veteran’s Hospital to honor the service of our nation’s veterans who died in the line of duty. Volunteers are needed to help serve lunch to current service members being treated at the hospital. Time TBA.

Please know that we are happy to help coordinate summer service experiences for your children. Nobles Summer Service Camp is open to members of Classes VI, V, IV and lll, and will be held at Nobles, August 9-13. More information can be found on our website. Your support of the Nobles Service Camp is much appreciated.

Another source of information for summer service is www.teenlife.com.

Have a great summer!
Linda Hurley and Louis Barassi

Host Program for New Nobles Families



Thank you to all the wonderful Upper School Host families who turned out to welcome incoming Upper School families on Monday evening, April 25. Host and new families gathered in the Performance Art Lobby for a festive reception and a light supper together. And thank you to the host families who will be attending the Middle School Orientation and welcoming the parents of incoming Class VI students on Tues., May 10. Click here to RSVP if you haven't already. Please park down by the MAC and arrive at the Castle by 6:15 p.m. to register, enjoy some refreshments and await the arrival of your family. Dinner will conclude by 7:40 p.m. We look forward to another fun evening of introducing newcomers to our wonderful Nobles community.

TO ALL HOST FAMILIES: If you have not met or spoken with your new family yet, please do so as soon as possible. For those who have connected, please try to keep in touch with your new family over the next few months. Look for emails from us over the summer and early fall, which we will ask you to forward to your families. This program is only as successful as our Host Families make it! Thank you again!


Deborah Kenealy, Chair
Rosita Fine and Gary Bloch, Co-Chairs
Host Program for New Nobles Families

Write To Us!



Visit the Parents' Calendar for Event Details & Information




Thank You!



May 2011: Class II Notes



It is hard to believe we are entering our last full month of school…and the month is full of activity. We hope all of you who came to the Class II cocktail party at the Castle enjoyed a wonderful and relaxed evening with fellow parents. Many thanks again to the Brosseau and Ordonez families for donating the beer and wine.

There are lots of tests being administered in May, including the SAT and SAT subject tests on May 7, and the AP tests, which will be administered from May 2 through May 12.

On a more entertaining note, be sure to mark your calendars for dawg-a-pella 3 on May 6, from 7:30-9:30 p.m., featuring incredible a cappella groups from the the ISL and other area schools. The spring musical, Urinetown: the Musical, a humorous spoof, will be performed Tuesday, May 17 through Saturday, May 21. The choral concert is on Thursday, May 26. Nobles’ Graduates' Day and Reunion take place throughout the weekend of May 13, with many fun events for parents and children alike. In addition to regular Saturday athletic contests, the Graduate’s Council is hosting an inaugural Athletic Hall of Fame ceremony, featuring 11 athletes and one team. The Hall of Fame ceremony will be followed by the graduates' lacrosse games. Graduates and current parents are all encouraged to participate in these fun events! Nobles/Milton games take place Friday and Saturday, May 27-28.

The final Parents' Association meeting is on Thursday, May 5, at 8:15 a.m. in the Castle Library. We hope to see many of you there.

Thanks, everyone, for a great year. We have thoroughly enjoyed representing our class and all the wonderful parents! ?

Your Class II Parent Representatives,
Lynn Gilbert - lynngil@hotmail.com
Lisa Soule - esoule@comcast.net

May 2011: Middle School Notes



It’s hard to believe that this is our final E-Newsletter! We hope that parents and students had a fulfilling school year so far, and are looking forward to the busy and exhilarating pace of May and June. We would also like to thank you all for all of your help with the various events throughout the year. Thank you for making our job easy!

Middle School Events in May/June 2011
Coming up in May:

Tuesday, May 3 - Round the World “RTW” Culminating Event for Class VI! The day begins with a surprise lunch for all middle schoolers and ends with an evening presentation for Class VI families and friends at 6 p.m., in Morrison Forum and all Middle School Classrooms.

Friday, May 6 – dawg-a-pella 2011! Join Nobles resident a cappella groups, the Nobleonians and the Greensleeves, for a fun evening of song, featuring The Northern Lights (Newton North), Forte (Newton), The Roxbury Latin Latonics, St. Marks Cat's Meow, St. Marks Octet, and special guests, The 508's! Performances start at 7:30 p.m. in Lawrence Auditorium.

Friday, May 6 - Middle School Multi-School Dance, Richardson Gym 7-9:30 p.m.

Friday May 6 - We hope all Class V parents can join us (while your children are at the dance) at the Class V Parent Social in the Castle from 7-10 p.m.

Friday, May 13 - Saturday, May 14 - Nobles Graduate/Reunion Weekend

Tuesday, May 17-Saturday, May 21 - Spring Musical, Urinetown

Wednesday, May 18 - The extremely popular Class V Solar Car Races & All-School BBQ on the tennis courts! Come and watch the various creations of the Fifthies as students race them across the tennis courts! Races begin after 10:30 a.m. (Rain dates: May 19 and 20)

Wednesday, May 25 - Come cheer on the Middle School teams as they finish their Spring season competing against Milton. Please refer to the athletic website, www.nobles.edu/athletics, for times and locations.

Thursday, May 26 - Middle School Day of Service! This is an important “command performance” for all Middle School students. No classes or Afternoon Program. Details to follow.

Monday, May 30 - No School - Memorial Day

Coming up in June:

Friday, June 3 - Nobles Graduation Day! Graduation is a required event for all students. All students should arrive at school by 8:15 a.m. All-School Assembly in Lawrence Auditorium will begin promptly at 8:30 a.m. Graduation ceremonies will begin at 10:00 a.m., and pick-up will be at the Middle School at noon. No lunch will be served. Graduation Dress Code: Girls - dress, skirt or dress pants. Boys - jacket and tie. No sneakers for any student.

Monday, June 6 - Thursday, June 9 - Final Exams!
Monday, June 6: English/EVL in the morning; Classics in the afternoon
Tuesday, June 7: Science in the morning
Wednesday, June 8: Modern Language in the morning; Geography/Civics in the afternoon
Thursday, June 9: Math in the morning

Thursday, June 9 - Class V Step Up Ceremony in Morrison Forum starting at 11:15 a.m. Class V parents, please come and share the experience as your Fifthie make the transition to the Upper School. BBQ to follow on the “The Beach.”

Friday, June 10 - No School - Comment Writing Day.

Monday, June 13 - Final Day of School! All-School Asembly, mini classes, individual advisor meetings. Students are dismissed after their advisor meeting.

Happy Summer!
Class V Reps
Anu Gulati (anu.gulati3@gmail.com)
Heather Zink (hjzink@mac.com)

Class VI Reps
Carol Taiclet (taiclet@comcast.net)
Heather Woodworth (hcwood45@yahoo.com)

Class III Dean's Report



The last time I wrote a newsletter, we were awaiting one of our many snowstorms from this winter. The weather certainly has transitioned since then, and each warm and sunny day we have reminds us that summer is not far away. Although the change in weather is a clear indicator that the school year is coming to a close, June always approaches more quickly than the students think it will. The next month will be full of academic challenges, athletic contests, musical performances and events leading up to the graduation of Class I, all of which contribute to how fast the month of May passes.

There have been several highlights from Class III in the second semester, and I would like to take this opportunity to applaud the students for their many achievements. All Class III students will have completed two major projects by mid-May: the US History Research Paper and the Novel Project in English III. Both of these projects are milestones of the Class III experience, and I commend the students for successfully navigating each of them while balancing their regular workload and extracurricular commitments. I also would like to acknowledge the students who applied to study away from Nobles for either a semester of next year or for the entire academic year. All students who applied to different programs took a risk in doing so, and I commend them for wanting to explore opportunities away from our campus. It takes courage to leave one’s surroundings for something that is challenging and unfamiliar, yet I know how much students grow when they participate in these valuable programs. Although Class III students will miss those who have decided to attend these programs, I know that everyone will benefit from hearing about their experiences upon their return.

There are several people whom I would like to thank as the year comes to a close. I especially want to express my sincerest gratitude to Kris Ganong and Valerie Thayer, both of who spent many hours planning and organizing events for Class III parents and guardians. I offer many thanks to Kris, Valerie and all of the parents and guardians who helped make the Class III Head of School Dinner and Dance on March 5 a great success. I appreciate how much planning went into making the event successful, and I can assure you that the students had a great time. I also would like to acknowledge the four SLC Representatives (students Alison Grogan, Savannah Horton, Caleb Kirshner and Cyrus Veyssi) who worked hard all year long to strengthen the spirit of their class and to create fun and engaging activities during our bi-weekly Class Meetings.

As I mentioned above, there are many events coming up in the next month, and all of these events can be found on the Nobles calendar. I hope that you join the other teachers and me and encourage your children to finish the year in a positive way and on a strong note in all of their classes and extracurricular activities. In order for you to plan ahead, I have listed the most important dates below:

Spring Musical: May 17-21
Nobles-Milton Weekend: May 27-28
Memorial Day (No school): May 30
Graduation: June 3
Exams: June 6-9
-June 6: English (a.m.) and Classics (p.m.)
-June 7: Science (a.m.)
-June 8: Modern Language (a.m.) and History (p.m.)
-June 9: Math (a.m.)
Final Day of School: June 13

I have enjoyed working with Class III once again this year, and I am eager to see the students become leaders in our community as they transition to being upperclassmen next fall. I look forward to a solid finish to this academic year, and I wish you a safe, healthy, peaceful and fun summer.

Best,
Tara Cocozza

10 Campus Drive,
Dedham, Massachusetts
02026
tel: 781.326.3700
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If you have questions, comments or suggestions for this newsletter, email Kim Neal at kim_neal@nobles.edu.